Tags

, , ,

This photo provided by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows oxidized copper hull sheathing and possible draft marks visible on the bow of wrecked ship in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas.

This photo provided by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows oxidized copper hull sheathing and possible draft marks visible on the bow of wrecked ship in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas.

(Huffington Post)

GALVESTON, Texas — Marine archaeologists made a thrilling discovery this week while examining a well-preserved shipwreck deep in the Gulf of Mexico – two other sunken vessels that likely went down with it during an early 19th century storm.
Much isn’t known about the ships, including the flag or flags they sailed under and the year they sank about 170 miles southeast of Galveston. They came to rest 4,363 feet, or nearly three-quarters of a mile, below the surface, making them the deepest Gulf or North American shipwrecks to have been systematically investigated by archaeologists, the researchers said.

Read more –>

Advertisements