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The dino tracks were preserved in natural casts formed after the creatures stepped in mud, and sand filled in their footprints. The result? Fossils that look like blobs with toes, Druckenmiller said. Here, a hind foot print of an herbivorous dinosaur. | Pat Druckenmiller.

The dino tracks were preserved in natural casts formed after the creatures stepped in mud, and sand filled in their footprints. The result? Fossils that look like blobs with toes, Druckenmiller said. Here, a hind foot print of an herbivorous dinosaur. | Pat Druckenmiller.

(Huffington Post Science)

Researchers may have just scratched the surface of a major new dinosaur site nearly inside the Arctic Circle. This past summer, they discovered thousands of fossilized dinosaur footprints, large and small, along the rocky banks of Alaska’s Yukon River.
In July, the scientists from the University of Alaska Museum of the North embarked on a 500-mile (800 kilometers) journey down the Tanana and Yukon rivers; they brought back 2,000 pounds (900 kilograms) of dinosaur footprint fossils.

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